Upside-down rhino research wins Ig Nobel Prize

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An experiment that hung rhinoceroses upside down to see what effect it had on the animals has been awarded one of this year's Ig Nobel prizes.

Other recipients included teams that studied the bacteria in chewing gum stuck to pavements, and how to control cockroaches on submarines.

The spoof prizes are not as famous as the "real" Nobels - not quite.

The ceremony couldn't take place at its usual home of Harvard University in the US because of Covid restrictions.

All the fun occurred online instead.

The science humour magazine, Annals of Improbable Research, says its Ig Nobel awards should first make you laugh but then make you think.

Hear Dr. Radcliffe speak live with BBC Radio's Colin Murray about the significance of the Namibian team's research and the impact of the Ig Nobel Prize:

BBC 5 LIVE - DR ROBIN RADCLIFFEIg Nobel Prize
00:00 / 06:43
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Rhino in Flight

Rhino in flight.JPG

Rhino in Air

Waterburg Rhino Hanging Study.jpg

Waterburg Rhino Hanging Study

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The Kunene Namibia 2010

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Rhino slinging 394

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Rhino sledge

NAMIBIAN RHINO RESEARCH

 

Publicity for Rhino Hanging Research

Our work received international attention in the following media:

CNN Call to Earth

National Geographic in Russian

Atlas Obscura

Italian science magazine Focus

German Radio Science Show

and most recently an Ig Nobel Award, which will be awarded from Harvard University via international broadcast on September 9.

Publicity for 2021 Ig Nobel Award

The Ig Nobel Prize story of our work resulted in many requests for interviews

 

RADIO

BBC Radio 5 Live- Colin Murray Show

PRINT

British Medical Journal

The Times of London

BBC Science

CNN

Polish Press

Danish Public Broadcasting Service

 

VIDEO

CBS News

TBS Tokyo